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Menopause and cognitive effects of oestradiol


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❓Did you know: Women are at increased risk of Alzheimer’s disease (being 68% of cases), influenced by the loss of oestrogen in menopause.


Oestradiol improves cognition and lowers risk of AD in post-menopausal women by at least 34%, with beneficial results dominating with use of topical oestradiol.[1-4]


The many benefits of oestradiol [5]

Oestradial helps memory and cognition:

  • Neuroprotective and modulating

    • ↑ neurogenesis, network activity and synaptic transmission

  • Master regulator of mitochondria

    • ↑ ATP/energy production

  • ↓ inflammatory response to beta-amyloid

    • ↓ beta-amyloid levels and toxicity, and ↑ clearance

Oestradial helps vascular health (which contributes to 40% of AD cases):

  • Enhances vascular health and ↓ cardiovascular death

    • ↓ oxidation of LDL cholesterol

    • ↓ plaque formation

    • ↑ vasodilation (stimulates nitric oxide)

    • Improves vascular elasticity

    • ↓ BP

Maximum cardioprotective effects when oestradiol is initiated at first symptoms of menopause and within first 10 years after menopause.[4]


Have a look at the evidence. Perhaps bioidentical HRT is part of the puzzle for many menopausal women.


References:

  1. Wharton W, et al. Potential role of estrogen in the pathobiology and prevention of Alzheimer's disease. Am J Transl Res 2009;1(2):131-147.

  2. Rahman A, et al. Sex and gender driven modifiers of Alzheimer's: The role for estrogenic control across age, race, medical, and lifestyle risks. Front Aging Neurosci 2019;11:315.

  3. Hogervorst E, et al. Hormone replacement therapy for cognitive function in postmenopausal women. Cochrane Database Syst Rev 2002;(3):CD003122.

  4. Mikkola TS, et al. Lower death risk for vascular dementia than for Alzheimer’s disease with postmenopausal hormone therapy users. J Clinical Endocrin Metabol 2017;102(3):870-877.

  5. Nilsen J, et al. Estradiol in vivo regulation of brain mitochondrial proteome. J Neurosci 2007;27(51):14069-14077.

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